Sale Banner
Blade HQ uses cookies to provide you a better user experience. By using this site, you accept our use of cookies.

CRKT Du Hoc Karambit Fixed Blade Knife (5.1" Black) 2630

CRKT Du Hoc Karambit Fixed Blade Knife (5.1" Black) 2630
CRKT Du Hoc Karambit Fixed Blade Knife (5.1" Black) 2630
CRKT Du Hoc Karambit Fixed Blade Knife (5.1" Black) 2630
For Size Reference For Size Reference
MSRP: $135.00
Our Price: $82.95
SSSSS
SSSSS
(2)
SSSSS
SSSSS
(2)
In Stock!
Quantity
Add to Wishlist
Item #BHQ-85386
Benchmade Seal

Specifications

  • Overall Length:9.625"
  • Blade Length:5.09"
  • Cutting Edge:4.25"
  • Blade Width:2.00"
  • Blade Thickness:0.20"
  • Blade Material:SK-5
  • Blade Style:Hawkbill
  • Finish:Black
  • Edge Type:Plain
  • Handle Length:4.53"
  • Handle Width:1.125"
  • Handle Thickness:0.70"
  • Handle Material:G-10
  • Color:Black
  • Weight:9.30 oz.
  • User:Right Hand, Left Hand
  • Sheath:GRN
  • Knife Type:Fixed Blade
  • Brand:CRKT
  • Model:Du Hoc
  • Model Number:2630
  • Designer:Austin McGlaun
  • Country of Origin:Taiwan
  • Best Use:Tactical
  • Product Type:Knife
Show All Specs

Specifications

  • Overall Length:9.625"
  • Blade Length:5.09"
  • Cutting Edge:4.25"
  • Blade Width:2.00"
  • Blade Thickness:0.20"
  • Blade Material:SK-5
  • Blade Style:Hawkbill
  • Finish:Black
  • Edge Type:Plain
  • Handle Length:4.53"
  • Handle Width:1.125"
  • Handle Thickness:0.70"
  • Handle Material:G-10
  • Color:Black
  • Weight:9.30 oz.
  • User:Right Hand, Left Hand
  • Sheath:GRN
  • Knife Type:Fixed Blade
  • Brand:CRKT
  • Model:Du Hoc
  • Model Number:2630
  • Designer:Austin McGlaun
  • Country of Origin:Taiwan
  • Best Use:Tactical
  • Product Type:Knife
Description

The CRKT Du Hoc offers a fierce tactical design from Austin McGlaun and Ryan Johnson of RMJ Tactical. This intimidating karambit fixed blade is part of the Forged By War program, created to honor Austin's uncle who earned a silver star in the battle of Point Du Hoc at the Normandy landings during World War II. The CRKT Du Hoc is a battle worthy karambit with a tough SK5 carbon steel blade and a textured G-10 handle. A portion of all profits from this knife go to support Austin McGlaun's Charity of choice, Purple Heart Homes.

Features:
  • SK5 high carbon steel provides a perfect balance of edge retention and blade toughness.
  • Textured G-10 handle scales offer a secure grip in difficult outdoor conditions.
  • Item includes a fitted GRN sheath that can be strapped anywhere on a gear kit for versatile carry.
Read More
Show Less
Reviews

Customer Reviews

Great Basics, but some Manufacturing Problems
SSSSS
SSSSS
Hughes W.
05-22-2020
This is a difficult review, because there's some very good stuff about this purchase...and some very bad stuff. First up, Blade HQ's price, service & delivery were absolutely great. 5 stars. You guys rock.

The design of the CRKT Du Hoc karambit (model 2630) is also great. Traditionally, karambits are double-edged...with reason: you need the back blade so you can cut with both forward and rearward motions. This almost tanto-like hawkbill has about a third of the back blade sharpened, and that seems a great compromise to safety of use while still having a cutting edge on the reverse.

Make no mistake: this is not a small knife. The size and balance is just what I was looking for, with a healthy safety ring that even my big finger doesn't get stuck in. Should add that I'm used to many knives--folders and karambits in particular--just not being designed for large hands. The Du Hoc could have a tad longer handle for me, but it'll work just fine. Design touches like the indented thumb brake/stop on the safety ring for extra support when the knife is flipped forward on the forefinger are well thought out. I've read a couple of reviews knocking the "nub" or "bump" at the top of safety ring, but I think it's a plus: it serves as not only an impact weapon but also as a glass-break tool.

Verdict out on this element: the point is extremely acute, like traditional karambits, but a fair amount of steel is removed from the 0.2" (~5 millimeter) blank in the last 1.5" to create that taper. The only specs on the steel at CRKT is that it's SK-5, so I assume it's closer to the American 1080 (0.8% carbon and about 0.9% manganese) than a 1050...so call it "high SK-5." That would make it a Rockwell hardness of around 65. That pristine needle point will, I imagine, be susceptible to chipping if it meets a solid impact. But otherwise that high SK-5 makes for a strong, tough blade that, while more difficult to sharpen, will take and hold a fine edge. But about that...

Now the not-so-good news. A karambit is a slicer, not primarily a stabber. A dull karambit is dangerous to the wielder because, in an emergency, it ain't gonna cut what it needs to cut. And the blade on this one arrived remarkably dull. Only about a 1-inch section along the blade would even slice standard printer paper and, examining the edge straight-on with focused lighting and a magnifier, much of it is clearly flattened and was never fully sharpened. This is my fifth CRKT knife and the first with this problem, which in this case is undoubtedly a quality control issue at the Taiwanese shop where these are produced. Everything about the knife itself is well done except for the edge.

The inner edge of a karambit is, of course, not the easiest thing in the world to effectively sharpen, especially if it's a hard steel. You can't use flat stones on it. And this one was bad enough that I needed to remove some material, not just hone the edge. I used the CRKT website contact form to inquire about the state of the edge, and about issues with the sheath (see below). I waited two weeks for any kind of response before taking matters into my own hands. Bad form, CRKT. Been using your knives for years, and this is the first time I needed to contact you for support about a problem.

Thinking that my regular rounded stones (which go as coarse as a 120 grit) for my Lansky sharpening system might not be up to the initial steel removal task, I bought a Lansky Q-Sharp that uses carbide in V-grooves to aggressively work an edge. That's a purchase I wouldn't have made if the Du Hoc had arrived with a usable edge.

The supplied glass-reinforced nylon sheath is a conundrum. It's pretty well made, but the mold and the Du Hoc's handle make it mostly useless...because the knife isn't just retained, it's RETAINED!

I worked the knife from fully seated to partially extracted scores of times hoping for a "break-in," but that hasn't helped. With the tensioning screw/eyelet completely removed, it still takes approximately 20 lbs. of pressure to remove the knife from the sheath...possibly less, but my only way to test was to attach the safety ring with a cord to dumbbells. I'm good with some solid tensioning, but that amount just isn't feasible for mounting on a belt or carrier. Without two hands to extract the knife, whatever it's attached to will simply have too much movement and play. The only way to fix it looks to be to file some material off two locations on the knife's handle, which I don't want to do.

And I'm no genius in geometry, but it doesn't take an IQ in the upper 99.9% to quickly realize that the odd belt mounting clip has only one practical way to attach it to the sheath, and that's with two screws along only one side of the sheath in holes that are only 1.5" apart. That or Dremel some material off the sheath and drill new holes in it. Bottom line here is that my best option seems to be to make my own Kydex sheath for the Du Hoc if I ever want to carry it on a belt. Oh, you can lace up the supplied sheath and lash it down to a plate carrier or vest--or maybe devise your own method to get it on a belt in a secure way that doesn't involve bolting it into the belt--but with both the sheath's retention and belt-mount device an issue, I'm going to scrap them and mold my own Kydex sheath.

Ergo the difficult review. I'd go 2.5 stars if I could, but I'm giving it 3 of 5 stars based on the quality of the karambit's design and overall construction. My experience was that this was a "some assembly required" purchase, and that's not what I expect when buying a knife. I'll chalk up CRKT's lack of response to my support request as a simple oversight, or maybe Coronapocalypse work-at-home problems, but that didn't help the review. I feel it's fair to knock off two stars for a dull blade, a useless sheath, and no customer service from the manufacturer. Now that I know what to expect (and what NOT to expect) I may buy a second one from Blade HQ for a matching pair. The knife itself is that good.
Best knife
SSSSS
SSSSS
Mathew B.
09-01-2018
First purchase from crkt and first karambit. Itís GREAT!! Solid as a tank. Extremely sharp on both edges. Finger hole is perfect. I have large hands and the handle fits perfect. Sheath is also very nice. GNR sheath is adjustable to fit any style on belt
Show All
Show Less
Description
Specifications
Reviews

The CRKT Du Hoc offers a fierce tactical design from Austin McGlaun and Ryan Johnson of RMJ Tactical. This intimidating karambit fixed blade is part of the Forged By War program, created to honor Austin's uncle who earned a silver star in the battle of Point Du Hoc at the Normandy landings during World War II. The CRKT Du Hoc is a battle worthy karambit with a tough SK5 carbon steel blade and a textured G-10 handle. A portion of all profits from this knife go to support Austin McGlaun's Charity of choice, Purple Heart Homes.

Features:
  • SK5 high carbon steel provides a perfect balance of edge retention and blade toughness.
  • Textured G-10 handle scales offer a secure grip in difficult outdoor conditions.
  • Item includes a fitted GRN sheath that can be strapped anywhere on a gear kit for versatile carry.
Read More
Show Less

Specifications

  • Overall Length:9.625"
  • Blade Length:5.09"
  • Cutting Edge:4.25"
  • Blade Width:2.00"
  • Blade Thickness:0.20"
  • Blade Material:SK-5
  • Blade Style:Hawkbill
  • Finish:Black
  • Edge Type:Plain
  • Handle Length:4.53"
  • Handle Width:1.125"
  • Handle Thickness:0.70"
  • Handle Material:G-10
  • Color:Black
  • Weight:9.30 oz.
  • User:Right Hand, Left Hand
  • Sheath:GRN
  • Knife Type:Fixed Blade
  • Brand:CRKT
  • Model:Du Hoc
  • Model Number:2630
  • Designer:Austin McGlaun
  • Country of Origin:Taiwan
  • Best Use:Tactical
  • Product Type:Knife
Great Basics, but some Manufacturing Problems
SSSSS
SSSSS
Hughes W.
05-22-2020
This is a difficult review, because there's some very good stuff about this purchase...and some very bad stuff. First up, Blade HQ's price, service & delivery were absolutely great. 5 stars. You guys rock.

The design of the CRKT Du Hoc karambit (model 2630) is also great. Traditionally, karambits are double-edged...with reason: you need the back blade so you can cut with both forward and rearward motions. This almost tanto-like hawkbill has about a third of the back blade sharpened, and that seems a great compromise to safety of use while still having a cutting edge on the reverse.

Make no mistake: this is not a small knife. The size and balance is just what I was looking for, with a healthy safety ring that even my big finger doesn't get stuck in. Should add that I'm used to many knives--folders and karambits in particular--just not being designed for large hands. The Du Hoc could have a tad longer handle for me, but it'll work just fine. Design touches like the indented thumb brake/stop on the safety ring for extra support when the knife is flipped forward on the forefinger are well thought out. I've read a couple of reviews knocking the "nub" or "bump" at the top of safety ring, but I think it's a plus: it serves as not only an impact weapon but also as a glass-break tool.

Verdict out on this element: the point is extremely acute, like traditional karambits, but a fair amount of steel is removed from the 0.2" (~5 millimeter) blank in the last 1.5" to create that taper. The only specs on the steel at CRKT is that it's SK-5, so I assume it's closer to the American 1080 (0.8% carbon and about 0.9% manganese) than a 1050...so call it "high SK-5." That would make it a Rockwell hardness of around 65. That pristine needle point will, I imagine, be susceptible to chipping if it meets a solid impact. But otherwise that high SK-5 makes for a strong, tough blade that, while more difficult to sharpen, will take and hold a fine edge. But about that...

Now the not-so-good news. A karambit is a slicer, not primarily a stabber. A dull karambit is dangerous to the wielder because, in an emergency, it ain't gonna cut what it needs to cut. And the blade on this one arrived remarkably dull. Only about a 1-inch section along the blade would even slice standard printer paper and, examining the edge straight-on with focused lighting and a magnifier, much of it is clearly flattened and was never fully sharpened. This is my fifth CRKT knife and the first with this problem, which in this case is undoubtedly a quality control issue at the Taiwanese shop where these are produced. Everything about the knife itself is well done except for the edge.

The inner edge of a karambit is, of course, not the easiest thing in the world to effectively sharpen, especially if it's a hard steel. You can't use flat stones on it. And this one was bad enough that I needed to remove some material, not just hone the edge. I used the CRKT website contact form to inquire about the state of the edge, and about issues with the sheath (see below). I waited two weeks for any kind of response before taking matters into my own hands. Bad form, CRKT. Been using your knives for years, and this is the first time I needed to contact you for support about a problem.

Thinking that my regular rounded stones (which go as coarse as a 120 grit) for my Lansky sharpening system might not be up to the initial steel removal task, I bought a Lansky Q-Sharp that uses carbide in V-grooves to aggressively work an edge. That's a purchase I wouldn't have made if the Du Hoc had arrived with a usable edge.

The supplied glass-reinforced nylon sheath is a conundrum. It's pretty well made, but the mold and the Du Hoc's handle make it mostly useless...because the knife isn't just retained, it's RETAINED!

I worked the knife from fully seated to partially extracted scores of times hoping for a "break-in," but that hasn't helped. With the tensioning screw/eyelet completely removed, it still takes approximately 20 lbs. of pressure to remove the knife from the sheath...possibly less, but my only way to test was to attach the safety ring with a cord to dumbbells. I'm good with some solid tensioning, but that amount just isn't feasible for mounting on a belt or carrier. Without two hands to extract the knife, whatever it's attached to will simply have too much movement and play. The only way to fix it looks to be to file some material off two locations on the knife's handle, which I don't want to do.

And I'm no genius in geometry, but it doesn't take an IQ in the upper 99.9% to quickly realize that the odd belt mounting clip has only one practical way to attach it to the sheath, and that's with two screws along only one side of the sheath in holes that are only 1.5" apart. That or Dremel some material off the sheath and drill new holes in it. Bottom line here is that my best option seems to be to make my own Kydex sheath for the Du Hoc if I ever want to carry it on a belt. Oh, you can lace up the supplied sheath and lash it down to a plate carrier or vest--or maybe devise your own method to get it on a belt in a secure way that doesn't involve bolting it into the belt--but with both the sheath's retention and belt-mount device an issue, I'm going to scrap them and mold my own Kydex sheath.

Ergo the difficult review. I'd go 2.5 stars if I could, but I'm giving it 3 of 5 stars based on the quality of the karambit's design and overall construction. My experience was that this was a "some assembly required" purchase, and that's not what I expect when buying a knife. I'll chalk up CRKT's lack of response to my support request as a simple oversight, or maybe Coronapocalypse work-at-home problems, but that didn't help the review. I feel it's fair to knock off two stars for a dull blade, a useless sheath, and no customer service from the manufacturer. Now that I know what to expect (and what NOT to expect) I may buy a second one from Blade HQ for a matching pair. The knife itself is that good.
Best knife
SSSSS
SSSSS
Mathew B.
09-01-2018
First purchase from crkt and first karambit. Itís GREAT!! Solid as a tank. Extremely sharp on both edges. Finger hole is perfect. I have large hands and the handle fits perfect. Sheath is also very nice. GNR sheath is adjustable to fit any style on belt
Show All
Show Less